Alzheimer’s disease is widely accepted to be defined by the widespread presence of extracellular plaques, formed from amyloid-B (AB) peptide, and intracellular neurobigrillary tangles, consisting of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau), in the cerebral cortex.

WE BELIEVE THE CURRENT DEFINITION OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IS WRONG AND WE ARE NOT ALONE.

                     “Dr. Alzheimer looked in his microscope and he saw amyloid and so that’s been the definition because that’s what he saw!” said Adam Brickman, an associate professor of neuropsychology at Columbia University.

                     “What blew my mind … is that the field didn’t say, ‘Oh, maybe we were wrong. Maybe (the doctor) was wrong. Maybe it’s not these plaques and tangles or maybe that’s not the whole story.’ That hasn’t been questioned enough and that just blows my mind.”

[Alzheimer’s Disease] was named after a German psychiatrist named Alois Alzheimer, who in 1906 described the peculiar case of a 51-year-old woman with dementia. After she died, Alzheimer peered at slices of her brain under a microscope and saw destroyed neurons, blobs of protein plaque and tangles of tough, thready material. These “plaques and tangles” became the hallmarks of the odd middle-age disease named after him.

For the next 70 years, it was only diagnosed in people under age 65.  Listen to the APM REPORT PODCAST Fading Minds: Why There’s Still No Cure for Alzheimer’s.

Additional articles supporting our view:

Why-theres-no-cure-for-Alzheimers-5daa0d2093568

Alzheimers-and-Dementia-in-the-Oldest-Old-A-Century-of-Challenges-Kawas-5daa012bc7d38

Elderly-Discovered-with-Superior-Memory-and-Alzheimers-Pathology-NorthWestern-5daa012a69002

PET-scans-show-many-Alzheimers-patients-may-not-actually-have-the-disease-Washington-post-5daa01293276c

Alzheimer-dementia-with-sparse-amyloid-AD-mimic-or-variant-Nature-5daa01281aceb